Their cheapest WordPress hosting plan starts from $0.80/month with a 48-month commitment and renews at $2.15/month. This plan includes 100GB bandwidth and 10GB storage which is optimal for a smaller WordPress website. Furthermore, 1 email account is included in all of their plans as well as a free SSL certificate. Additional CDN is not included. And if you’re not satisfied with their service, you can get a full refund until 30 days from the signup.
You gain the most web-building functionality if you create a self-hosted site. This typically involves transfering the free WordPress CMS to server or signing up for a web host's optimized WordPress plan. With an optimized plan, the host automatically handles backend stuff, so you don't have to worry about updating the plug-ins and CMS, and enabling automatic backups. In these instances, the WordPress environment typically comes pre-installed on the server.

There are a few different reasons. Our award-winning support is always high on the list of why people move their presence to GoDaddy. Of course, our prices — including a free 1-year extension on many domain transfers — is another popular reason. And if you already have one or more of our products, transferring your domain, website or hosting to us lets you consolidate your web presence with one provider so it’s easier to manage.
It is very rare for a customer to exceed normal usage while managing a website. Typically, customers only experience issues if they use their accounts for storage (for example large multimedia files) or file sharing. Our hosting services are not intended to support these activities, and in accordance with our Terms of Service your disk space and bandwidth usage must be integrated into the normal operation of a website. We offer various plans that better address high bandwidth and large storage requirements. Please contact us for details.
If you're planning on selling a product, look for a web host that offers a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate, because it encrypts the data between the customer's browser and web host to safeguard purchasing information. You're probably familiar with SSL; it's the green padlock that appears in your web browser's address bar as you visit an online financial institution or retail outlet. A few companies toss in a SSL certificate free of charge; others may charge you roughly $100 per year for that extra security layer.
iPage also offers “WordPress” hosting. They have 2 WordPress plans which cost $3.75/month and $6.95/month(renew at $7.49 and $10.49/mo respectively), both plans come with a free domain name for 1 year. iPage main goal is to ensure the best possible experience, from registration to customer support. They are more aimed towards beginners as their $6.95/mo plan comes with “expert” WordPress support.
What we don’t like about their billing process, is that although they offer 30-day money-back, your hosting will automatically renew up to fifteen (15) days before the end of your current term. Furthermore, there are lots of upsells you might want to consider, such as upgrading your plan, as they have concerning bandwidth and storage policy (see Support transcript).
Middle English ost, host "person who receives guests, guest," borrowed from Anglo-French oste, hoste, going back to Latin hospit-, hospes "guest, visitor, person receiving guests," going back to dialectal Indo-European *ghosti-pot- (whence probably also Old Church Slavic gospodĭ "lord, master"), from *ghost-i- "outsider, guest" + *pot- "one in control, master" — more at guest entry 1, potent entry 1
WordPress' origins can be traced back to the beginning of 2001 when the blogging solution B2/cafelog was launched by French programmer Michael Valdrighi. B2/cafelog was an innovative solution at the time because it introduced the ability for pages to be created dynamically with a MySQL database. Valdrighi continued to work on B2/cafelog and released version 1.0 in 2002. Shortly afterward, Valdrighi stopped developing his solution. This was particularly unfortunate because B2/cafelog had actually grown its user-base to a reasonable number. These users were left without a supported solution.
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