WordPress is an uber-popular content management system that powers more than 32 percent of the world wide web. Its success is understandable; WordPress is easy to use, and it boasts an incredible library of themes and plug-ins that enhance your site in many ways. In fact, WordPress is the foundation for millions of websites, from personal pages to big brand online destinations, such as Bloomberg and The New Yorker. If you're thinking about building a website and don't want to code it from scratch, WordPress is the way to go.

It’s important to note that there are two subgenres of WP hosting: WordPress.org and WordPress.com. The latter is a free, fully-hosted site that allows you to build and host basic website with the people who created the platform.  Although the WordPress hosting platform is on its way up, it’s not yet the ideal option for folks who are looking to run a business site or aspire to grow a substantial web presence. If you’re doing anything more than posting your resume or blogging your ideas, you want WordPress.org hosting.
iPage also offers “WordPress” hosting. They have 2 WordPress plans which cost $3.75/month and $6.95/month(renew at $7.49 and $10.49/mo respectively), both plans come with a free domain name for 1 year. iPage main goal is to ensure the best possible experience, from registration to customer support. They are more aimed towards beginners as their $6.95/mo plan comes with “expert” WordPress support.
WordPress hosting prices are all over the map. Entry-level plans should cost roughly the same as shared web hosting, but higher-tier plans can scale upward to around $60 per month. The upside? Your WordPress installation should run more smoothly and setup should be easier in a WordPress environment than in a traditional hosting environment. In addition, going the managed WordPress route may save you money in the long run, as it might save you the cost of hiring a system administrator to perform the same tasks. This can be particularly beneficial to small businesses.
If you're planning on selling a product, look for a web host that offers a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate, because it encrypts the data between the customer's browser and web host to safeguard purchasing information. You're probably familiar with SSL; it's the green padlock that appears in your web browser's address bar as you visit an online financial institution or retail outlet. A few companies toss in a SSL certificate free of charge; others may charge you roughly $100 per year for that extra security layer.
Your web hosting account is where your website files are stored. So it’s very important that you secure it. The best way to secure your WordPress hosting account is to use a strong password and avoid logging in from public locations (unless you’re using a VPN). We also recommend that you follow our ultimate WordPress security guide to protect your site.
WordPress is a free and open-source CMS with plugin architecture and a system of templates. WordPress, like many CMS competitors, is template-based. The user chooses a theme, customizes it to personal preferences, and the website is ready to go. With many plug-ins and add-ons available, WordPress can create any site imaginable. This versatile software creates commercials, social media, blogs, and special interest websites around the world.

WordPress is a free and open-source CMS with plugin architecture and a system of templates. WordPress, like many CMS competitors, is template-based. The user chooses a theme, customizes it to personal preferences, and the website is ready to go. With many plug-ins and add-ons available, WordPress can create any site imaginable. This versatile software creates commercials, social media, blogs, and special interest websites around the world.
Why? Because word of mouth only gets you so far in the internet era. People discover new businesses—even local business—via Bing, Google, and Yahoo. The days when they'd just look you up in the yellow pages are long gone. If you don't have a sharable website address, your chances of building online word of mouth via social networking plummet, too. In other words, no website, no discoverability, no money. Of course, web hosting isn't just for businesses. You may want to host a personal website or blog, too. Either way, the services here have you covered.

That said, not all web hosts offer email. WP Engine, for example, does not. In such instances, you must email accounts from a company other than your web host. GoDaddy, for instance, sells email packages starting at $3.49 per user, per month. That might sound like a hassle, and just one more thing to keep track of, but there are actually some webmasters who feel that separating your email hosting and web hosting services is smart. That way, one provider going offline won't completely bork your business.
Their pricing starts from $2.75/mo which allows you to sign up for 36 months. The renewal price (after your initial period) is $7.99/mo. But this is very common in the hosting market, and almost all popular hosting providers are using it. If you opt to choose them, make sure you take their hosting plan for the longest period; this helps you to save some money. If you are not satisfied with their service, they offer a hassle-free 30-day money-back guarantee.
Their pricing starts from $2.75/mo which allows you to sign up for 36 months. The renewal price (after your initial period) is $7.99/mo. But this is very common in the hosting market, and almost all popular hosting providers are using it. If you opt to choose them, make sure you take their hosting plan for the longest period; this helps you to save some money. If you are not satisfied with their service, they offer a hassle-free 30-day money-back guarantee.
The aforementioned features are valuable to the web hosting experience, but none can match the importance of site uptime. If your site is down, clients or customers will be unable to find you or access your blog or your products or services. Potential new customers may miss your site altogether, and existing customers may go elsewhere out of frustration or confusion.
In housing terms, VPS hosting is like renting your own apartment in a larger building. You're much more isolated than in the roommate situation mentioned above; it's still possible that a neighboring apartment could causes annoyance for you, but far less likely. In web hosting terms, Site A's traffic surge won't have nearly as much impact on Site B or Site C. As you'd expect, VPS hosting costs more than shared hosting. You'll pay roughly $20 to $60 per month.
Hey Caroline, WordPress.com is a bit of a different animal because you don’t run a self-hosted WordPress site on there. That means, you can’t install all the plugins you might want to (especially on lower plans, where you can’t install plugins at all) and overall have less control over your site than with a self-hosted site. That’s why we didn’t include it in this list. For more information, I recommend this article: https://websitesetup.org/wordpress-com-vs-wordpress-org/
WordPress is the #1 website creation software in the world. Powering over 25% of the internet, WordPress provides everything you need to create a beautiful and powerful website. Built by a community of global developers, WordPress is continuously being improved and refined to provide the best functionality and performance for its users. This open source approach has made WordPress the website creation and management platform of choice for new and skilled users all over the world.
Their pricing starts from $2.75/mo which allows you to sign up for 36 months. The renewal price (after your initial period) is $7.99/mo. But this is very common in the hosting market, and almost all popular hosting providers are using it. If you opt to choose them, make sure you take their hosting plan for the longest period; this helps you to save some money. If you are not satisfied with their service, they offer a hassle-free 30-day money-back guarantee.
You also need to consider how long you'll need WordPress web hosting. If it's a short-term project—say, less than a month or two—you'll typically receive a refund should you cancel your hosting within 60 days. Some companies offer 30-day money-back guarantees, while others offer 90-day money-back guarantees. Once again, it's beneficial to do your homework.
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