Bottom line, managed WordPress hosting is hassle free fast WordPress hosting with high-quality support from staff with lots of WordPress experience. While all this sounds amazing, the plans for managed WordPress hosting is usually on the higher end of the scale. For example a personal account with a popular managed WordPress hosting provider costs $29/month where you can only host 1 site (getting maximum of 25,000 visitors per month). The next level higher where you are allowed multiple domains will cost you $99/month. A person starting out a blog cannot afford this.
Why? Because word of mouth only gets you so far in the internet era. People discover new businesses—even local business—via Bing, Google, and Yahoo. The days when they'd just look you up in the yellow pages are long gone. If you don't have a sharable website address, your chances of building online word of mouth via social networking plummet, too. In other words, no website, no discoverability, no money. Of course, web hosting isn't just for businesses. You may want to host a personal website or blog, too. Either way, the services here have you covered.

A handful of domains will have restrictions on them, which means you can only purchase them if you meet or exceed certain criteria or have authorization (some examples are .gov, .edu and .mil). But most extensions are available to everyone. In fact, most country code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) are available for anyone to purchase, even if you don't reside in the country code in question.
Virtual Private Server (VPS) refers to a virtual machine. It is a method of partitioning a physical server computer into multiple servers with respect to the individual customer’s need. Even though you are sharing the server with a handful others, this gives you almost as much control as a dedicated server. It also has the privacy of a separate physical computer and can be configured to run specific server softwares. Often developers, intermediate users, and medium-sized bloggers utilize VPS to scale their websites. If you do NOT have any technical knowledge, then you need to make sure that you purchase a managed VPS. This means that the WordPress hosting provider manages all system upgrades, and they are available to assist you if needed.
The first step in customizing your WordPress site is to log into your WordPress install. From there, you'll actually find an "Appearance" section within your WordPress dashboard dedicated to helping you customize your site. The easiest and most likely the method you'll find most effective is by using a pre-made WordPress theme. Just click the "Add New Theme" button to browse through a number of theme options. You can search for themes as well as use the Feature Filter. The Feature Filter is an excellent way to discover a theme that you like the most. This is where you can narrow down themes based on features, the type of layout you want and the subject of your site. 

Many web hosts offer limited features in their starter packages and then expand the offerings (sometimes tremendously) for higher-tier plans. Read the small print to make sure the plan you are selecting offers what you need. If you need a site builder application to design your website, make sure that the low-cost web host you are picking actually comes with a site builder. Many of them require you to pay for the builder as a separate add-on. Website builders usually don't cost a lot of money, but if you can find a web host that includes one for free, that's money in your pocket. And, if it's integrated with your hosting service, you're more likely to have a smooth, supported experience.
WordPress' origins can be traced back to the beginning of 2001 when the blogging solution B2/cafelog was launched by French programmer Michael Valdrighi. B2/cafelog was an innovative solution at the time because it introduced the ability for pages to be created dynamically with a MySQL database. Valdrighi continued to work on B2/cafelog and released version 1.0 in 2002. Shortly afterward, Valdrighi stopped developing his solution. This was particularly unfortunate because B2/cafelog had actually grown its user-base to a reasonable number. These users were left without a supported solution.
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