The WordPress team continued to grow and friends of Mullenweg like Christine Sellect Tremoulet would also contribute to the project. Tremoulet actually was the one who suggested the name "WordPress". WordPress v1.0 was released in January 2004 under the code name Davis. Some of the newest features in this release included SEO friendly permalinks, the ability to post to multiple categories, the addition of comment moderation and Atom support. A few months later in May 2004, version 1.2 was released. This was a bit of a landmark release for WordPress because support for plugins was added in this version. Plugins have played a huge part in helping WordPress grow to the levels it has today because of their ability to add just about any functionality you could want to a site.

WordPress is free so there are no additional monthly hosting costs except for custom themes, premium plug-ins, and so on, though any additional plug-ins or add-ons consume utility resources. You can get cheap WordPress Hosting for your site, but you want to make sure you get a quality and reliable provider. For big photo galleries, shared media files, or large databases users should plan their budgets accordingly. The WordPress application is a free download from Wordpress.org or it can come pre-installed from A2 Hosting (we also offer an easy 1-click setup via Softaculous if you prefer). With the latter method, the basic framework of a new WordPress site can be running in a few minutes. Manually downloaded installations can more intricate but a web administrator should be able to get your WordPress site up fairly quickly.
If you aim to have a web presence, you've got to have email. It's a convenient way for potential customers and clients to send you a message, Word document, or other files. Thankfully, most web hosts include email in the price of their hosting plans. Some web hosts offer unlimited email account creation (which is great for future growth), while others offer a finite amount. You, naturally, should want unlimited email.
If you're planning to create a WordPress-powered site, there's no reason not to invest in WordPress-specific hosting. It's chock full of benefits. That said, a WordPress environment won't allow you to set up a non-WordPress site—that's something else to keep in mind, especially if you have a site in mind that will rely on specific frameworks, for example. In such instances, you'll want to go build your site on shared hosting, VPS hosting, or dedicated hosting services. And, if you want to start your own web hosting company, reseller hosting is the way to go.
The first step in customizing your WordPress site is to log into your WordPress install. From there, you'll actually find an "Appearance" section within your WordPress dashboard dedicated to helping you customize your site. The easiest and most likely the method you'll find most effective is by using a pre-made WordPress theme. Just click the "Add New Theme" button to browse through a number of theme options. You can search for themes as well as use the Feature Filter. The Feature Filter is an excellent way to discover a theme that you like the most. This is where you can narrow down themes based on features, the type of layout you want and the subject of your site.
WordPress is a free and open-source CMS with plugin architecture and a system of templates. WordPress, like many CMS competitors, is template-based. The user chooses a theme, customizes it to personal preferences, and the website is ready to go. With many plug-ins and add-ons available, WordPress can create any site imaginable. This versatile software creates commercials, social media, blogs, and special interest websites around the world.

Shared hosting is by far the most popular type of WordPress hosting used by beginners. It is the most affordable and quite frankly a good starting point for new users. Shared hosting is where you share a large server with a lot of sites. By having multiple sites on the same server, hosting providers can offer the service at a more affordable rate. The biggest catch that we see with shared hosting across all providers (including the ones we recommend below) is the unlimited resources. There is no such thing as unlimited. While it says unlimited, you still have usage restrictions. If your site starts to take up substantial server load, they will politely force you to upgrade your account. If they don’t take this action, then it can have a negative effect on the overall performance of other sites hosted on the same server. It gets back to conventional wisdom. As your business grows, so will your overhead cost.

You can also host your website on WordPress.com, but that's different from the kind of hosting mentioned above. WordPress.com uses the same code from WordPress.org, but it hides the server code and handles the hosting for you. In that sense, it resembles entries in our online site builder roundup. It's a simpler but less flexible and customizable way to approach WordPress hosting. It's definitely easier, but if you want to tinker and adjust and optimize every aspect of your site, it might not be for you.
Web hosting services offer varying amounts of monthly data transfers, storage, email, and other features. Even how you pay (month-to-month payments vs. annual payments) can be radically different, too, so taking the time to plot exactly what your company needs for online success is essential. Many of these companies also offer reseller hosting services, which let you go into business for yourself, offering hosting to your own customers without requiring you to spin up your own servers.
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