In our detailed DreamHost review, we also evaluated their customer support, features, and pricing. After our analysis, we find DreamHost to be a great option for businesses who value privacy. They offer free domain privacy with each of their domains. They also recently fought the U.S. department of Justice to protect the privacy of one of their customer’s website.
The article doesn’t list geographical location of the server as one of the consideration one should consider when choosing a hosting company. Isn’t geographical proximity, between the hosting server and the targeted population of the website, one of the parameters that Google’s algorithm uses when ranking a website? E.g. If I my website is in German and is targeting German people, wouldn’t it be better to host it in a server in Germany (ignoring, for the sake of this question, the issue of speed)?
WordPress hosting prices are all over the map. Entry-level plans should cost roughly the same as shared web hosting, but higher-tier plans can scale upward to around $60 per month. The upside? Your WordPress installation should run more smoothly and setup should be easier in a WordPress environment than in a traditional hosting environment. In addition, going the managed WordPress route may save you money in the long run, as it might save you the cost of hiring a system administrator to perform the same tasks. This can be particularly beneficial to small businesses.

Hey Caroline, WordPress.com is a bit of a different animal because you don’t run a self-hosted WordPress site on there. That means, you can’t install all the plugins you might want to (especially on lower plans, where you can’t install plugins at all) and overall have less control over your site than with a self-hosted site. That’s why we didn’t include it in this list. For more information, I recommend this article: https://websitesetup.org/wordpress-com-vs-wordpress-org/


The WordPress team continued to grow and friends of Mullenweg like Christine Sellect Tremoulet would also contribute to the project. Tremoulet actually was the one who suggested the name "WordPress". WordPress v1.0 was released in January 2004 under the code name Davis. Some of the newest features in this release included SEO friendly permalinks, the ability to post to multiple categories, the addition of comment moderation and Atom support. A few months later in May 2004, version 1.2 was released. This was a bit of a landmark release for WordPress because support for plugins was added in this version. Plugins have played a huge part in helping WordPress grow to the levels it has today because of their ability to add just about any functionality you could want to a site.
You can also host your website on WordPress.com, but that's different from the kind of hosting mentioned above. WordPress.com uses the same code from WordPress.org, but it hides the server code and handles the hosting for you. In that sense, it resembles entries in our online site builder roundup. It's a simpler but less flexible and customizable way to approach WordPress hosting. It's definitely easier, but if you want to tinker and adjust and optimize every aspect of your site, it might not be for you.
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