WordPress hosting prices are all over the map. Entry-level plans should cost roughly the same as shared web hosting, but higher-tier plans can scale upward to around $60 per month. The upside? Your WordPress installation should run more smoothly and setup should be easier in a WordPress environment than in a traditional hosting environment. In addition, going the managed WordPress route may save you money in the long run, as it might save you the cost of hiring a system administrator to perform the same tasks. This can be particularly beneficial to small businesses.
It’s important to note that there are two subgenres of WP hosting: WordPress.org and WordPress.com. The latter is a free, fully-hosted site that allows you to build and host basic website with the people who created the platform.  Although the WordPress hosting platform is on its way up, it’s not yet the ideal option for folks who are looking to run a business site or aspire to grow a substantial web presence. If you’re doing anything more than posting your resume or blogging your ideas, you want WordPress.org hosting.
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In the early parts of 2003, college freshmen Matt Mullenweg wrote on his blog that he wanted to create a fork of B2/cafelog. He had been using the software to post photos from his trip to Washington D.C. He teamed with Mike Little to continue work on this new solution. This was around the same time that Valdrighi made an announcement that Little and Mullenweg would be taking lead on the B2/cafelog fork. The team launched the first version of WordPress in May 2003, using the same structure as B2/cafelog.
Well, you went over speed and pricing but what about security. Who has the best overall when security is figured in. I ask because one of the ones you have listed I am on and they didn’t catch the websites being hacked I have 17 websites with code in them, they didn’t catch. It looks like bitcoin mining to me. See I keep asking why my website was loading so slow and they keep saying it was because they were not optimized right. Now the same sites were loading in 1.6 seconds to 1.8. Now they were taking 6.5 to 8 and even 9 seconds to load. THey cost me a great deal of time and money over this and even my backups are junk. I add this also they never found the problem till I personally found the problem and pointed it out. Needless to say, I am done with them…
Well, you went over speed and pricing but what about security. Who has the best overall when security is figured in. I ask because one of the ones you have listed I am on and they didn’t catch the websites being hacked I have 17 websites with code in them, they didn’t catch. It looks like bitcoin mining to me. See I keep asking why my website was loading so slow and they keep saying it was because they were not optimized right. Now the same sites were loading in 1.6 seconds to 1.8. Now they were taking 6.5 to 8 and even 9 seconds to load. THey cost me a great deal of time and money over this and even my backups are junk. I add this also they never found the problem till I personally found the problem and pointed it out. Needless to say, I am done with them…
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You gain the most web-building functionality if you create a self-hosted site. This typically involves transfering the free WordPress CMS to server or signing up for a web host's optimized WordPress plan. With an optimized plan, the host automatically handles backend stuff, so you don't have to worry about updating the plug-ins and CMS, and enabling automatic backups. In these instances, the WordPress environment typically comes pre-installed on the server.


You gain the most web-building functionality if you create a self-hosted site. This typically involves transfering the free WordPress CMS to server or signing up for a web host's optimized WordPress plan. With an optimized plan, the host automatically handles backend stuff, so you don't have to worry about updating the plug-ins and CMS, and enabling automatic backups. In these instances, the WordPress environment typically comes pre-installed on the server.
Your WordPress software comes pre-installed and A2 Optimized on your Shared Hosting account. Thanks to testing, testing and more testing by our team of experts, A2 Optimized ends the guesswork of how to get the fastest page loads for your WordPress software. A2 Optimized provides auto-configuration so you get the best performance and most secure settings. That way you can instead turn your focus to building your site, writing content and promotion.
You can also host your website on WordPress.com, but that's different from the kind of hosting mentioned above. WordPress.com uses the same code from WordPress.org, but it hides the server code and handles the hosting for you. In that sense, it resembles entries in our online site builder roundup. It's a simpler but less flexible and customizable way to approach WordPress hosting. It's definitely easier, but if you want to tinker and adjust and optimize every aspect of your site, it might not be for you.
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