Shared hosting is web hosting in which the provider houses multiple sites on a single server. For example, Site A shares the same server with Site B, Site C, Site D, and Site E. The upside is that the multiple sites share the server cost, so shared web hosting is generally very inexpensive. In fact, you can find an option for less than $10 per month. 

Bottom line, managed WordPress hosting is hassle free fast WordPress hosting with high-quality support from staff with lots of WordPress experience. While all this sounds amazing, the plans for managed WordPress hosting is usually on the higher end of the scale. For example a personal account with a popular managed WordPress hosting provider costs $29/month where you can only host 1 site (getting maximum of 25,000 visitors per month). The next level higher where you are allowed multiple domains will cost you $99/month. A person starting out a blog cannot afford this.
The WordPress application is free. There are free themes and plugins to get started. Many startup businesses set up their websites with no expenses aside from their hosting and domain costs. Premium WordPress add-ons incur fees, some for a few dollars or a donation. Others cost hundreds of dollars annually but are mostly for advanced users. A WordPress website, like any other, consumes bandwidth and may grow over time. The more content, media, and plugins the site has, the more likely resource needs will increase. You should plan and budget accordingly for new expenses as your account grows. At first, shared hosting works well for most WordPress sites, but most users upgrade their plans when they outgrow their shared hosting accounts, especially ecommerce or business sites. A2 Hosting is where you can get high quality, affordable hosting for WordPress!
If you register a domain with Bluehost when signing up for a hosting account, there is a domain fee that is non-refundable. This not only covers our costs, but ensures that you won't lose your domain name. Regardless of the status of your hosting service, you'll be free to manage it, transfer it after any required lock periods, or simply point it elsewhere at your convenience. You retain ownership of your domain until the end of its registration period unless you elect to extend it.
We've reviewed many WordPress hosting services aimed at individuals and small businesses, and included our favorites this guide. The chart above, which includes traditional web hosts that offer WordPress hosting and dedicated WordPress services, gives you a quick overview of the features you can find with each service. If you want a more in-depth look at those WordPress hosting services, read the full reviews, linked below.
If you're planning on selling a product, look for a web host that offers a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate, because it encrypts the data between the customer's browser and web host to safeguard purchasing information. You're probably familiar with SSL; it's the green padlock that appears in your web browser's address bar as you visit an online financial institution or retail outlet. A few companies toss in a SSL certificate free of charge; others may charge you roughly $100 per year for that extra security layer.
Once you decide you price range, you need to consider how long you'll need web hosting. If it's a short-term project—say, less than a month or two—you can typically receive a refund should you cancel your hosting within 60 days. Some companies offer 30-day money-back guarantees, others offer 90-day money-back guarantees. Once again, it's beneficial to do your homework.
Shared hosting is web hosting in which the provider houses multiple sites on a single server. For example, Site A shares the same server with Site B, Site C, Site D, and Site E. The upside is that the multiple sites share the server cost, so shared web hosting is generally very inexpensive. In fact, you can find an option for less than $10 per month.
WordPress is an uber-popular content management system that powers more than 32 percent of the world wide web. Its success is understandable; WordPress is easy to use, and it boasts an incredible library of themes and plug-ins that enhance your site in many ways. In fact, WordPress is the foundation for millions of websites, from personal pages to big brand online destinations, such as Bloomberg and The New Yorker. If you're thinking about building a website and don't want to code it from scratch, WordPress is the way to go.
We’ll be looking at this list several times a year, so keep an eye out for us re-opening the survey for hosts to submit themselves for inclusion. Listing is completely arbitrary, but includes criteria like: contributions to WordPress.org, size of customer base, ease of WP auto-install and auto-upgrades, avoiding GPL violations, design, tone, historical perception, using the correct logo, capitalizing WordPress correctly, not blaming us if you have a security issue, and up-to-date system software. 

WordPress' origins can be traced back to the beginning of 2001 when the blogging solution B2/cafelog was launched by French programmer Michael Valdrighi. B2/cafelog was an innovative solution at the time because it introduced the ability for pages to be created dynamically with a MySQL database. Valdrighi continued to work on B2/cafelog and released version 1.0 in 2002. Shortly afterward, Valdrighi stopped developing his solution. This was particularly unfortunate because B2/cafelog had actually grown its user-base to a reasonable number. These users were left without a supported solution.
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