In our detailed DreamHost review, we also evaluated their customer support, features, and pricing. After our analysis, we find DreamHost to be a great option for businesses who value privacy. They offer free domain privacy with each of their domains. They also recently fought the U.S. department of Justice to protect the privacy of one of their customer’s website.


Their cheapest WordPress hosting plan starts from $0.80/month with a 48-month commitment and renews at $2.15/month. This plan includes 100GB bandwidth and 10GB storage which is optimal for a smaller WordPress website. Furthermore, 1 email account is included in all of their plans as well as a free SSL certificate. Additional CDN is not included. And if you’re not satisfied with their service, you can get a full refund until 30 days from the signup.
The WordPress team continued to grow and friends of Mullenweg like Christine Sellect Tremoulet would also contribute to the project. Tremoulet actually was the one who suggested the name "WordPress". WordPress v1.0 was released in January 2004 under the code name Davis. Some of the newest features in this release included SEO friendly permalinks, the ability to post to multiple categories, the addition of comment moderation and Atom support. A few months later in May 2004, version 1.2 was released. This was a bit of a landmark release for WordPress because support for plugins was added in this version. Plugins have played a huge part in helping WordPress grow to the levels it has today because of their ability to add just about any functionality you could want to a site.
Note that we're speaking here of the WordPress.org CMS that acts as the foundation for your self-hosted website, not WordPress.com. The latter CMS has more in common with website builders than traditional website hosting. In effect, WordPress.com is a turnkey (and more limited) WordPress solution, whereas the services in this roundup offer a vastly more flexible (and labor-intensive) DIY approach.
Above all else, we strive to deliver outstanding customer experiences. When you buy a domain name from Namecheap, we guarantee it will be handed over to you with superior standards of service and support. Our primary goal is to build a customer-focused atmosphere filled with the happiest customers in the galaxy. The Namecheap guarantee is our mark of excellence.
Once you decide you price range, you need to consider how long you'll need web hosting. If it's a short-term project—say, less than a month or two—you can typically receive a refund should you cancel your hosting within 60 days. Some companies offer 30-day money-back guarantees, others offer 90-day money-back guarantees. Once again, it's beneficial to do your homework.
In our detailed DreamHost review, we also evaluated their customer support, features, and pricing. After our analysis, we find DreamHost to be a great option for businesses who value privacy. They offer free domain privacy with each of their domains. They also recently fought the U.S. department of Justice to protect the privacy of one of their customer’s website.
SiteGround is one of the most popular and highest rated hosting provider in the WordPress community. They provide unique in-house WordPress speed and security solutions to make your site as fast and secure as possible. They are known for the best 24/7 support in the industry which is why they're an official 'WordPress' recommended hosting provider. This is also why we use SiteGround for hosting the WPBeginner website. SiteGround features include automatic upgrades, built-in WP caching, CDN, one-click staging and GIT version control. They are also one of the few companies offering location specific hosting with 3 data centers in USA, Europe, and Asia. On top of all this, they have а special 70% discount for WPBeginner readers.
Shared hosting is by far the most popular type of WordPress hosting used by beginners. It is the most affordable and quite frankly a good starting point for new users. Shared hosting is where you share a large server with a lot of sites. By having multiple sites on the same server, hosting providers can offer the service at a more affordable rate. The biggest catch that we see with shared hosting across all providers (including the ones we recommend below) is the unlimited resources. There is no such thing as unlimited. While it says unlimited, you still have usage restrictions. If your site starts to take up substantial server load, they will politely force you to upgrade your account. If they don’t take this action, then it can have a negative effect on the overall performance of other sites hosted on the same server. It gets back to conventional wisdom. As your business grows, so will your overhead cost.
There are a few different reasons. Our award-winning support is always high on the list of why people move their presence to GoDaddy. Of course, our prices — including a free 1-year extension on many domain transfers — is another popular reason. And if you already have one or more of our products, transferring your domain, website or hosting to us lets you consolidate your web presence with one provider so it’s easier to manage.
WordPress.org references the open-source (free) software that can be downloaded and installed pretty easily, particularly if you have a web host that makes this process a breeze. Self-hosted WordPress allows you to capitalize on the robust offerings of the established content management system, plus the potential for more features, such as a free domain, unlimited email accounts, marketing credits, and expert support). 

WordPress' origins can be traced back to the beginning of 2001 when the blogging solution B2/cafelog was launched by French programmer Michael Valdrighi. B2/cafelog was an innovative solution at the time because it introduced the ability for pages to be created dynamically with a MySQL database. Valdrighi continued to work on B2/cafelog and released version 1.0 in 2002. Shortly afterward, Valdrighi stopped developing his solution. This was particularly unfortunate because B2/cafelog had actually grown its user-base to a reasonable number. These users were left without a supported solution.
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