Users don't need much technical knowledge or expertise. WordPress offers search engine optimization-friendly uniform resource locators, resource description framework site summary feeds, post categories, sticky pages, and an interface suitable for nontechnical writers who want to contribute to the content and to queue, schedule, moderate, and protect posts and pages with passwords.
Note that we're speaking here of the WordPress.org CMS that acts as the foundation for your self-hosted website, not WordPress.com. The latter CMS has more in common with website builders than traditional website hosting. In effect, WordPress.com is a turnkey (and more limited) WordPress solution, whereas the services in this roundup offer a vastly more flexible (and labor-intensive) DIY approach.
With pre-installed WordPress, you don't have to worry about downloading and installing any software. You'll simply have your site up and running in no time at all. Your WordPress install will be A2 Optimized meaning it comes pre-configured for the fastest page load speeds and most secure settings. A2 Optimized WordPress is the result of the research and tests we've run to determine the WordPress settings providing peak site performance. There's no guesswork involved! That way you can focus on your time on writing content and promoting your website instead of installing and testing plugins. Our A2 Optimized WordPress setup will also auto-harden your site with a number of security features like automatic WordPress updates and providing you with a unique login URL, all in an effort to keep your site secure from hacks.
PCMag, PCMag.com and PC Magazine are among the federally registered trademarks of Ziff Davis, LLC and may not be used by third parties without explicit permission. The display of third-party trademarks and trade names on this site does not necessarily indicate any affiliation or the endorsement of PCMag. If you click an affiliate link and buy a product or service, we may be paid a fee by that merchant.
Note: The dual meanings "host"/"guest" of Latin hospes and its progeny are due to customs of reciprocity: a person serving as guest on one occasion would act—and be expected to act—as host on another occasion to a visiting former host. Both Latin hospes and Slavic gospodĭ have undergone a considerable degree of phonetic reduction from their putative etymons—in particular in the Slavic case, where Latin unstressed syllable reduction and syncope were not at play—leading some to question the correctness of the etymologies. Parallel compounds with the same second element are Greek despótēs "master, lord" (going back to *dems-pot- "master of the house"; see despot), Sanskrit dámpatiḥ "householder, lord of the house," Avestan də̄ṇg paitiš; Sanskrit viśpátiḥ "chief of a settlement/tribe," Avestan vīspaitiš, Lithuanian viẽšpats "lord" (with outcomes of Indo-European *u̯iḱ-, *u̯oiḱ- "house, community"; see vicinity).

Another recurring theme in our reviews is the talk of unlimited hosting — domains, storage, email, bandwidth, databases, and other tools. The truth is, however, when a host boasts unlimited storage or site traffic, they really mean they’ll allow you to use as much as you want — to a point. Yes, there are limits to unlimited, but chances are you’ll never get anywhere near that ceiling. Furthermore, the most reliable web hosts will give you a heads up when you’re approaching the maximum and start talking to you about your options for scaling.
In housing terms, VPS hosting is like renting your own apartment in a larger building. You're much more isolated than in the roommate situation mentioned above; it's still possible that a neighboring apartment could causes annoyance for you, but far less likely. In web hosting terms, Site A's traffic surge won't have nearly as much impact on Site B or Site C. As you'd expect, VPS hosting costs more than shared hosting. You'll pay roughly $20 to $60 per month.
×